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What's really interesting to me as I read reviews of the Zune HD vs. iPod,  iPhone vs. Pre, Android, etc. is that now the emphasis is on the fact that the App store has "an app for that."

From a technical standpoint, all the above competing products are equivalent (or better) than the Apple product, but the developer support and application variety make the Apple product more compelling.

Now turn your attention to the Macintosh. In the Mac vs. Windows vs. Linux debate, Windows has an iPhone-like lead in developers and apps. There, Apple's push is on the beautiful hardware and elegant user interface. There are more than enough apps to get by, really, don't worry your little head about that. Is this a stable dichotomy?




Comments (5)
Craig Wiseman September 18th, 2009 05:32:39 AM

 Comments
1) Have you noticed that Apple uses exact opposite approaches in selling iPhones/iPods & Macs?
Maria Helm http://www.mariahelm.com 9/18/2009 8:18:15 AM

I think this is because the needs/perceptions of the products are so different. People have been dealing with PCs (windows/mac/linux) for a long time, and they just expect there to be software available that does what they want.

But smartphones are fairly new, and people aren't aware of all the things you can do with them.

My complaints about the "there's an app for that" commercials are more along the lines that (a)other smartphones already do something similar without having to download a special app (b)cool interface <> more useful/easier (c)so, how much do I end up paying for all those apps?

2) Have you noticed that Apple uses exact opposite approaches in selling iPhones/iPods & Macs?
Charles Robinson http://www.cubert.net 9/18/2009 9:10:10 AM

This portable wave is pretty interesting to me. I've always been a fan of the idea of portable computing power that can be morphed into something else, so I was considering getting an Archos 7 { Link } . Then I learned you have to pay for the more commonly used video and audio codecs, the built-in browser is Opera and you can't install a different one.

I agree with Maria, to some degree there is a difference in consumer expectation between the various form factors. People don't use their desktop computers the same way they use their portable ones.

For Apple there is also a difference in market share. While their desktop computers have less than 5% market shared they pretty much own the boutique smartphone market (I know Nokia sells more handsets, but Apple fans are a rabid bunch). They're taking a page out of Microsoft's playbook by using their market share to become *the* platform for developers, which is attracting customers outside the influence of Steve Jobs' reality distortion field. Or maybe it's only making that field bigger.

In any case, I understand what you're saying, but I think it makes perfect sense. Different platforms have different users, and those users have different needs. Apple is being very, very smart by appealing to as many as possible across as many fronts as possible.

Now if they could just make iTunes not try to eat my computer I might actually use some of their products. :-)

3) Have you noticed that Apple uses exact opposite approaches in selling iPhones/iPods & Macs?
Craig Wiseman http://www.Wiseman.La/cpw 9/18/2009 11:13:59 AM

Yep. Another train of thought would be as/if MacOS marketshare keeps rising, they should be able to rise to a more equitable position in the app arena.

The big question about that is the health of Steve Jobs. If/when Mr. Jobs leaves Apple, it's pretty much sunk, as we saw the last time he left Apple. One could also argue that while he's been semi-absent, Apple has made on incremental updates to its products.

So this may well be the apex of Apple we're seeing.

4) Have you noticed that Apple uses exact opposite approaches in selling iPhones/iPods & Macs?
Craig Wiseman http://www.Wiseman.La/cpw 9/18/2009 12:01:13 PM

To elaborate on the "they're toast w/o Mr. Jobs" comment. The problem for Apple is that Mr. Jobs' maniacal personality helps make Apple great, but it drives away most/all possible replacements that might have emerged from within Apple.

This has made Palm very happy, as Mr. Rubinstein seems to be doing an excellent job at resuscitating what was a zombie company, and there are other examples.

5) Have you noticed that Apple uses exact opposite approaches in selling iPhones/iPods & Macs?
Craig Wiseman http://www.Wiseman.La/cpw 9/18/2009 12:04:58 PM

@Charles... I thought it was just my machine iTunes likes to snack on. I use it to get podcasts that I sync to my Bold (thanks RIM for having that integration!).

Folks call Notes a fat client, but wow - between iTunes & RIM's desktop 'manager', it looks positively.... svelte.


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