only search Wiseman.La

The World NEXT ends 


 IBM has an excellent track record of keeping it's software and hardware lines moving along, rarely letting any with business value to customers die. That's admirable in the IT world.
That said, it's clear that IBM's app server of choice for future serious development is Websphere. If you look at all the big new radical projects that IBM's working on, they're all based on it.
That's not to say that other IBM products (like Domino) are going to be ditched! IBM does a very good job of keeping even what it considers to be legacy software and hardware lines plugging along, adding value year in, year out.

Websphere Lite One of the things that I've seen is that IBM salesfolk love to plug Websphere - they've obviously gotten the message as well. The issue for me is that Websphere, Websphere Portal, etc. have a very large foot print that doesn't fit Smb customers as well as IBM would like. I spent some of last week learning about IBM's CommonStore product from some folks at IBM. One part of the presentation was on enterprise content management. Notes/Domino was not mentioned at all. In fact, pretty much the only time Domino came up at all during the whole process was strictly as an email server. You'd think that IBM wouldn't care which of it's products kicked Microsoft's butt, yet sometimes it seems as if there's as much contention between sections of IBM as between IBM & Microsoft.

Notes & Domino have a long history of evolving. Notes started out running on DOS or OS/2. It has evolved (radically) over time, with the Notes server being renamed Domino when the server got all the cool internet functions (HTTP, SMTP, POP etc) that we take for granted built in to it. The Notes client is continuing to evolve with the introduction of the Eclipse platform in Notes 8. I wonder why we can't keep adding radical new features/functions/capabilities to Domino as well.

We have problems. Seems like IBM would like to have a single message for developers, sales folks, and customers. Domino is an excellent product that has a history of evolving, and there are lots of open source/easily available tools. IBM's long term app server seems way too big and complicated to fit small customers.

So how do we solve it? We get two versions of Websphere, Websphere Lite and Websphere Gargantua.

What does this get IBM? Something they seem to desperately want: a single message to "buy Websphere!".  This has worked well in other areas, like DB2. There are significant differences between the various flavors of DB2 on the different platforms (Windows, System i, AIX, etc), but it's still easy for sales folks to understand and broadcast. It's just that it'll be Websphere Lite on the low-end, and Websphere Gargantua on the high-end. It gives them products that will fit well in both huge and tiny companies.

What does this get us? It gets us a way to move our smaller clients into the J2EE/Portal/Web3.1 world without requiring them to buy 15 servers and spend weeks configuring things. It moves the Domino functions back into a primary place in IBM's marketing and internal mindshare. On the cynical side, it would keep IBM honest in the "we build standards-based solutions" area, as it seems at this point that virtually all IBM J2EE software requires DB2 & WAS, which sounds awfully proprietary. Having it be able to run on both Geronimo in WSlite & WAS in WSg would mean it's really standards-based.

Almost all the items below exist already, it's just a matter of IBM stitching them together and presenting them to customers as a unified package (really important). I think that's worth ditching the Domino name if that's what it takes.

What are some of the features that Websphere Lite should have?
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteThe full Lotus Domino server (shhhh don't tell anyone) sans the webserver
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteApache webserver (or something like it to replace the traditional Domino http server)
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteApache Geronimo (or something like it to provide low-end J2EE support)
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteJetspeed/Pluto (or something like it to provide low-end jsr 168/286 support)
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteA JDBC driver that allows Java/J2EE apps to talk to either DB2 or Domino/NSF backends with the same syntax
(I've heard that this can't be done, yet we've been doing joins against a Domino/NSF datasource for 10 years using NotesSQL. Seems like that could work for JDBC as well)
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteLTPA & LTPA2 single-signon support for PHP, etc running under the Domino server via Apache.
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteA focus from IBM on the fact that for 0-250 users, all this stuff must be able to run on one server.
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteA focus from IBM that other products (Sametime, RTC gateway, etc) will be able to run in the J2EE environment on Websphere Lite, including using NSF instead of DB2
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteSimple, unified logging of everything to the Log.nsf (instead of various text files spread everywhere)
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteDomino administrator management of Geronimo & Jetspeed/Pluto
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteDesigner-on-Eclipse to provide really good web development.
Image:Let’s call the next version of Domino (after 8), Websphere LiteLift the 64GB limit on individual NSFs.



Hey, plus the unified colors are perfect....

Comments (15)
Craig Wiseman April 24th, 2007 10:00:00 AM